Perfection.

It looks a little different to everyone. To one person, it might mean riding off into the sunset with true love: the key to happy ever after. For another, that perfect peak is a degree obtained in a certain amount of time, a corporate ladder climbed by a certain date. To another still, the highest of heights might look like a certain amount of money in the bank, the ticket to their definition of freedom.

At my workplace, most of the staff members I work with are around my age. Practically all of us have two things in common: we all have post-secondary education, and we feel that the afterlife of said education leaves much to be desired. None of us knows quite where to go next. But we’ll talk to each other and share how sure we were that a 4.0 GPA and a piece of paper were the missing pieces to the key that opened the door to the perfection that was supposed to be the rest of our professional lives.

Perfection. Happiness. Purpose.

Those three concepts have become so closely linked in today’s world that the words themselves often seem interchangeable. Yet how often have we found ourselves unsatisfied with the life we try to establish at the top of every “perfect” peak?

Our dissatisfaction is due to the fact that in our flesh, we cannot comprehend perfection. Jesus is the only being who has a claim to it. In comparison to Him, our righteousness (any goodness or morality in us) is likened to filthy rags (Isaiah 6:46). The Bible says that “as the heavens are higher than the Earth, so are [God’s] ways higher than [our] ways, and [His] thoughts than [our] thoughts,” (Isaiah 55:9).  When we try to obtain perfection, we end up disappointed and frustrated because it is not in us to comprehend the very thing we are trying to grasp.

The pursuit of perfection is not synonymous with the pursuit of our purpose. Rather, it is quite the opposite. Perfection is the enemy of our purpose because in pursuing it, we are led to believe that upon reaching our perceived ideal, there will be no more need for growth or progress.

But God’s purpose for each of us is infinite. That’s why He gave us souls that are eternal. When we in our flesh try to obtain perfection, we set finite goals that ultimately leave us wanting and unfulfilled upon completion.

It is not God’s will that we reach a certain point where we stop growing in any aspect of our lives. That is why we will never be satisfied sitting on what we designate to be a “perfect” peak. We will always be left wanting more because we were made for more!

Think of God’s purpose for you like the horizon. If you see a mountain in the horizon and work towards it, you will get to it. With God’s help, you will climb it. Once you climb it, another horizon will always be within your view. 

The mountain is the milestone, not the finish line.

So listen and pray. Seek God’s purpose for you in the here and now. Pursue it relentlessly, passionately and fearlessly, knowing that the God who knows you better than you know yourself has provided you with an endless horizon and a new pursuit at every mountain top.

May you continue to experience extraordinary in Him!

Antrisha Balakumaran